Past Events

2015
2015 Events

[SEMINAR]
The Australian Space Eye
Dr Lee Spitler
Macquarie University & Australian Astronomical Observatory


1pm
Monday, 19th October
Lecture Theatre - Room 224
Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

The Australian Space Eye will consist of a 6U CubeSat that will house an astronomical telescope. I will detail scientific objectives of the mission and how they have driven the preliminary design of the CubeSat. I will discuss preliminary details on communication systems, the science payload, and maintaining sub-arcsecond pointing stability. The spacecraft complements a ground-based observing system, Huntsman, which is optimised for detecting extend, faint astronomical targets at shorter wavelengths of light.

Dr. Lee Spitler is a lecturer jointly based at Macquarie University and the Australian Astronomical Observatory. He uses observations of distant galaxies from large telescopes to map out the historical timeline of our universe. In 2010, he received his PhD in Astrophysics with a specific expertise in using astronomical imaging to study the evolution of galaxies.

[PUBLIC LECTURE]
BLUEsat Mars Rover In Poland
UNSW BLUEsat OWR Poland Team:
Christopher Miller
Helena Kertesz
Yilser Kabaran
Daniel Krajsic
Harry Day


6pm
Friday, 9th October
Theatre G03
Ainsowrth Building (Mechanical Engineering)
UNSW Kensington Campus

The BLUEsat Off-World Robotics team is back from Poland where they competed in the European Rover Challenge and came 15th out of 40 teams! Our Mars analogue Rover competed with teams from India, USA and Canada in several challenges, including remote control and rough terrain traversal.

Join the team as they present on their Rover design and their journey to the European Rover Challenge. The Rover itself will be making a guest appearance during the lecture!

The 45 minute presentation will be followed by an informal meet and greet where members from OWR and the Poland team will be around to answer questions and let you get up and close with the Mars Rover.

BLUEsat Off-World Robotics is a student lead project at UNSW that aims to design, build and operate Rovers designed for the Moon, Mars and beyond. To date the team has completed two major expeditions with two models of rover, including the BLUEtongue Rover which competed in the 2015 European Rover Challenge.

The OWR team consists of over 15 undergraduate Electrical, Mechanical and Computer Science Engineers and is part of the greater BLUEsat Undergraduate Space Research group at UNSW. BLUEsat is currently recruiting any interested university students.

For more information please visit the BLUEsat website.

[SEMINAR]
The miniaturized charge exchange thruster for nano-satellites
A/Prof Joe Khachan
University of Sydney


1pm
Monday, 7th September
Seminar Room G3
Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Thrusters enable satellites to control attitude and orbital altitude. Well established thrusters include cold gas, chemical and plasma thrusters. The latter have higher specific impulse but can result in the charging up of the satellite as ions are ejected to produce thrust. Consequently, a neutralizing mechanism, such as an external electron beam is included. The Hall Thruster is the most successful plasma thruster, but has not been miniaturized, both in size and power, for it to find applicability on nano-satellites. In this talk, details will be given of a new type of plasma thruster known as the charge exchange thruster. The two standout features of this thruster is that it is self-neutralizing, without the need for an electron source, and it can be miniaturized both in size and power requirements that make it suitable for nano-satellites.

[SEMINAR]
ProtoSAT: Educational Satellite Hardware
Andreas Antoniades
Obelisk Systems


1pm
Friday, 4th September
Seminar Room G3
Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Andreas from Obelisk Systems gives an introduction to the ProtoSAT satellite system and its place in the space industry, as well as a brief discussion about the journey and challenges associated with development of educational space hardware.

[PUBLIC LECTURE]

THE EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY’S ROSETTA MISSION TO COMET 67P:
The first interplanetary space exploration mission to successfully orbit and land a scientific probe on the surface of a comet more than 500 million km from Earth

    Image via www.esa.int

Warwick Holmes
Avionics System Engineer
& Former ESA Rosetta Team Member

6:30pm
Monday, 3rd August 2015
Theatre G03, Ainsworth Building (J17)
UNSW Kensington Campus

Tickets are FREE but this event is expected to be booked out. Registration for this event is essential.


 
Eventbrite - [PUBLIC LECTURE] The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission to Comet 67P
 

Warwick Holmes is 53 years old, was born in Sydney and also lived in Adelaide and Canberra during his early years. Warwick attended Sydney University graduating with a Bachelor of Science and Electrical Engineering and later a Masters degree in Technology Management from the University of NSW.

For the last 29 years Warwick has been working in Europe exclusively on the development of European Space Agency spacecraft including: Scientific, Earth Observation, Telecommunications, Navigation and Manned spacecraft programs. He is an Avionics System Engineer specializing in the integration and testing of spacecraft hardware and software and project management. He was an ESA staff member that worked on the Rosetta program for 5 years during the building, testing and launch phases of this mission.

Warwick has performed five launch campaigns at the ESA launch base in French Guiana, South America, with the Ariane-3, Ariane-4, Ariane-5 and Soyuz-STB launch vehicles. He was designated as the "Spacecraft Support Team leader" (SST) responsible for giving the final "Go-for-Launch" call from French Guiana to the Flight Operations Director in ESOC Germany to start the final automatic launch countdown sequence of the Rosetta Mission on 2nd March 2004.

The Rosetta spacecraft has been in interplanetary flight through the solar system for more than 11 years traveling a total distance of 7 billion kilometres, four times around the Sun to reach Comet-67P. Rosetta has achieved several "firsts" in space exploration history being the first spacecraft to orbit and land a science probe directly onto the surface of a comet.

This event is proudly presented in a joint venture between the
Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research
and the
UNSW Branch of the American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics

 

[SEMINAR]
ACSER IGNSS Presentations
9 July 2015
1pm
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


  • Dr Joon Wayn Cheong (Research Associate)
    Modelling and Mitigating Multipath and NLOS for Cooperative Positioning in Urban Canyons
  • Dr Eamonn Glennon (Senior Research Associate)
    Autonomous Physical Time Synchronization Method for Navigation Systems
  • Dr Eamonn Glennon (Senior Research Associate)
    Results from kea V4.1 FPGA-based GPS Receiver Performance Testing
  • Ms Laure Demicheli (Practicum exchange student)
    Detecting the Presence of Spoofers using Multipath Detection Techniques
  • Mr Vinh Tran (PhD candidate)
    An Efficient Secondary Code Transition Cancellation Correlator for Fast MultiGNSS Acquisition
  • Mr Vinh Tran (PhD candidate)
    Programmable Custom Multi-Core Architectures for Multi-Constellation GNSS Receiver

The IGNSS2015 symposium and exhibition will be held from 14-16 July, 2015 at the Outrigger Hotel, Gold Coast, Australia. IGNSS2015 provides an excellent opportunity to hear all the latest developments in GNSS and related Position, Navigation and Timing technologies. An interesting measure of how rapidly the Multi-GNSS era is now unfolding is that 6 days in March 2015 saw the launch of 5 GNSS satellites; 1 GPS, 2 Galileo, 1 IRNSS and 1 Beidou.

In 2015 ACSER team members are contributing 12 presentations and 1 poster to the conference, as well as moderating or chairing several sessions.

[SEMINAR]
Cooperative Positioning
A/Prof Feng Shen
College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University (China)
& Visiting Fellow, ACSER UNSW

12pm
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Relative position awareness is a vital premise for the implementation of emerging intelligent transportation systems, such as collision warning and speed advisory. However, commercial Global Satellite Navigation Systems (GNSS) receivers do not satisfy the requirements of these applications. Fortunately, Cooperative Positioning (CP) systems, based on inter-vehicle communications, have improved performance of relative positioning in a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET). In the presentation, the enhanced tightly–coupled CP technique is presented and analysed by adding the measurements from low-cost inertial sensors, and the Doppler shift of the carrier of Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) signals, and Ultra-Wide Bandwidth (UWB), which can effectively enhance the performance of relative positioning especially in low GPS visibility and GPS outages.

Feng Shen is an associate professor with the College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, China. He received his PhD in 2009 from Harbin Engineering University. He developed the signal acquisition and tracking of the Spread spectrum receiver for the GPS ground-based augmentation systems. His research interests include BOC signal tracking, and GNSS/INS integrated navigation system. From May 2014 to May 2015, he is a visiting academic with the Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research (ACSER) at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). During his visiting, he worked on the Cooperative Positioning in Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) which was based on fusing the measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS), Ultra-Wide Bandwidth (UWB) and Inertial Navigation System (INS).

[SEMINAR]
Flavia Tata Nardini, LaunchBox
12pm
Tuesday, 28 April 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


LaunchBox is an educational programme intended to put CubeSat technologies inside Australian Schools a give a boost to STEM education. The seminar will also include information about the SatCom constellation project, a fleet of 150 satellites that will bring internet to remote areas of the world.

Flavia Tata Nardini began her career at the European Space Agency, before she joined TNO to apply her technical knowledge to advanced space propulsion engineering projects. She rapidly became involved in project management and business development within the space and defence domain. She has successfully completed full lifecycle development of satellites and several micro thrusters currently flying on actual space missions and filed two patents in both rocket and satellite propulsion.

She is currently the CEO and Co-founder of LaunchBox.

[SEMINAR]
Dr Jason Held, Saber Astronautics / UNSW
12pm
Tuesday, 14 April 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


Find out about Saber's story as a space engineering startup in Australia, and their journey to modernize the way the space industry conducts Mission Control.

Dr. Jason Held, prior to founding Saber Astronautics, was a US Army Major and Space Support Team leader for USSTRATCOM (formerly Space Command) and deployed globally in support of military space missions. He was a flight software engineer on the Hubble Space Telescope and tester for the International Space Station, as well as a senior space instructor for USSTRATCOM and an engineer for the Space and Missile Command Battle Lab. At the University of Sydney, he founded the space engineering laboratory, providing leadership for the university small satellite project and Australia's first premix rocket engine. He is also an active member of AIAA's Space Logistics Technical Committee, and is currently lecturing with the UNSW Australia School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering.

[WORKSHOP]
Launching CubeSats For and From Australia
1st April 2015
UNSW Kensington Campus

See the event website for further details and to view the presentation slides.

Click here to watch the live recording of this event on YouTube.

This event brought together international and domestic experts in small satellite mission design, construction and launch to examine the challenges of launching small satellites for Australia, and eventually from Australia. A varied cross section of stakeholders will discuss the current state of the art and constructive ideas for advancing Australia’s position in the space industry.

We welcome participation from active domestic and international researchers, as well as interested parties from government, industry and the public.

[SEMINAR]
Development of a space habitat simulator: SHEE - Self-deployable Habitat for Extreme Environments
Dr Barnaby Osborne
ACSER / International Space University


1pm
Thursday, 26 March 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

 

This seminar describes the lessons learnt from building a space simulation habitat. Further, it shows the versatility of the design which can be transformed from a habitable space for two into a greenhouse or into an astrobiology laboratory, all functional elements needed for extended stays on extra-terrestrial surfaces.

Read more...

Human exploration of extra-terrestrial surfaces require extensive preparation upfront. This implies the simulation of mission scenarios with simulation tools and infrastructure. Future missions will include remote and autonomous assembly of required mission elements on the Moon or Mars. In this context the project SHEE, a Self Deployable Habitat for Extreme Environments, is being developed to support these preparatory efforts. Developed under a three year European Commission FP7 grant, the SHEE is a rigid segment deployable habitat test bed designed for use in space analogous environments. SHEE is the first ever built European simulation habitat and thus presents a milestone in the European history of human spaceflight preparations.

The objective of the SHEE project is to develop a self-deployable habitat test bed that will support a crew of two for a period of up to two weeks in duration. During this time the habitat will provide for all of the environmental, hygiene, dietary, logistical, professional, and psychological needs of the crew. Unlike most space analog habitats, the SHEE will use commercial transportation infrastructure, allowing for cost effective transportation to space analog sites across Europe and also overseas. Once on site, the habitat will be autonomously deployed with no human intervention required, and will be able to re-pack itself with minimal human assistance.

SHEE is modular so that more than one habitat can be joined together to create a larger structure. Design studies were also undergone to show that SHEE can be transformed into a small experimental simulation greenhouse and into an astrobiology laboratory. Thus it can be envisioned that an assembly of more than one SHEE habitat can create a large base incorporating all functions for early surface exploration.

Qualification and testing of the fully outfitted SHEE test-bed began in April of 2015 at Compagnie Maritime D Expertises in Marseille, and will conclude in October of 2015 at the International Space University in Strasbourg. Through building this deployable test bed important experiences for building have been made starting from developing requirements to choosing the right size for easy transportation on land and by sea, appropriate structural integrity, suitable materials amongst other issues.

[SEMINAR]
Arkaroola Mars Robot Challenge Expedition
Dr Jon Clarke
12pm
Wednesday, 18 March 2015
Rountree Room 356, Level 3
Biological Sciences Building (D26)
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel


The seminar will provide an expedition overview of the Challenge, a summary of preliminary results, and examine possibilities of future expeditions to evaluate the performance of science robots in the field.

Read more...

The Arkaroola Mars Robot Challenge Expedition was the latest of a series of expedition run by Mars Society Australia (MSA) since its inception in 2001. Destinations of previous expeditions have included the Pilbara, Woomera, and the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah, as well as Arkaroola. The expedition ran from Friday 4th July to Sunday 20th July. There were some 30 participants in all, most stayed for the full two weeks.

The aims of the Expedition were:

  1. Test a range of field robotic systems at Arkaroola with the goal of developing concepts for planetary operations, especially Mars. Participants include Murdoch University (WA), University of New South Wales, Mars Society India, and MSA.
  2. Test control of remote robotic and human field operations at Arkaroola from centralised mission control run by Saber Astronautics from their operations centre in Sydney.
  3. To test human field science capabilities while wearing simulated space suits, specially evaluating the ability of both scientists and non-scientists to recognise stromatolites at a test site.
  4. Explore astrobiological and geobiological features of the Arkaroola region. This component of the expedition by a team from Macquarie University (NSW), focussing on the putative microfossils of veins in the Tapley Hill Formation and biomarkers of the oldest known sponge-stromatolite reefs in the Balcanoona Formation.
  5. Work with teachers from NSW and South Australia, both on the expedition and those visiting Arkaroola, to better equip them in teaching of science.
  6. To stimulate and inspire students and researchers in the disciplines of field robotics, planetary geology, astrobiology, and education through multidisciplinary interaction in the field.
  7. Reach out to the public using lectures at Arkaroola and media contacts, emphasising the importance of planetary science, field robotics, and astrobiology to both the Australian and global community.

[SEMINAR]
System Engineering of a Martian Ice Miner for In Situ Resource Utilization in Support of a Mars Colony

Martian Landscape from the Pathfinder rover
Image via www.nasa.gov
Mr Thierry De Roche
UNSW School of Mining & Ecole Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne


12pm
Monday, 16 March 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel


For a number of reasons Mars' colonization is the next stop in our exploration of the Solar System. in order to sustain human presence on our neighbour planet as well as optimizing the launch mass, a colony will rely on the resources extracted from the colonized location. The most important feedstock is water, as other vital products like breathable oxygen can be derived from it. This work focuses on identifying extractable sources of water and presents a way of deriving them.

A mining site in the mid-latitudes of Mars is proposed for its high ground water ice content of 40 wt % buried under a relatively ice free layer of 15cm depth and favourable extraction conditions. The Mars I Situ Water Extraction rover concept rom Honeybee Robotics is chosen as miner and its subsystems are proposed, outlined and sized. The miner uses an auger to drill trough the ice free layer and retains only the ice rich soil on its find. The drill is retracted into a sleeve and sealed to hear up the mixture of soil and ice. The water ice is gasified and collected. The modified Snap 19RTF is chosen as power source and its excess heat is used to bake the icy soil, which requires an active thermal control system. Phase Change Materials thermal storages along with loop heat pipes are proposed to distribute and reject the RTGs heat. Power and mass budgets are dressed and the rover is estimated to weight ~100kg. The system has an estimated Efficiency of Mining Mass per Year of 2-kg/year/kg of miner mass.

[SEMINAR]
BLUEsat Stratospheric Balloon Testing:
Serving UNSW space research activities by providing a vehicle for testing space systems and space hardware in near-space conditions
Ian Bartlett
BLUEsat President

12pm
Thursday, 12 March 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel


In January, the BLUEsat team, mentored by EET’s Dr Elias Aboutanios, successfully launched a stratospheric balloon from Muswellbrook and safely recovered its payload, consisting of a control computer, tracking equipment and two GoPro cameras. The balloon rose to a height of 25,000m, and was tracked the balloon using a Spot GPS and an APRS tracker, both through the APRS network and through our own receiving station with software developed by the BLUEsat team. The BLUEsat team comprised 6 undergraduate Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering students and 2 Electrical Engineering undergraduate students.

This successful mission is a great step towards our goal of building reliable stratospheric balloon launch capabilities to take payloads to an altitude of 35-40km and recover them safely. This will serve multiple goals, including (i) serving space research activities within the faculty with a vehicle for testing space systems and space hardware in near-space conditions, and (ii) running high school outreach competitions for students to develop payloads, with the winning team or teams going with us on the launch mission to see their payload go to the stratosphere.


[SEMINAR]
Bistatic Radar
Mr Cameron Cooke
ACSER Thesis Student


12pm
Tuesday, 10 March 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel


Bistatic Radar using signals of Opportunity (eg GPS) offers the potential to develop cheap, passive and low weight sensors that can be carried on UAV's. Applications include remote sensing, altimeter and DEM creation. Find out more about the theory behind GPS bistatic radar, as well as experiments that can be conducted using real world data.

[SEMINAR]
Prof. Eduardo Bezerra
Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil
5:30pm for a 6pm start
Wednesday, 5 March 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel

Developing Projects in the Brazilian Space Program Context: A Case Study in the Design and Implementation of a Critical Embedded System for Space Applications

Read more...

The Brazilian Space Program started in 1961 as a government initiative named “Group for the Organisation of the National Space Activities Commission” (GOCNAE). In all these years, in order to cope with the deadlines and requirements associated to the variety of missions, very specific procedures and standards have been adopted. The presentation will briefly introduce the Brazilian Space Program, and how academic institutions manage to develop joint projects with the National Institute for Space Research (INPE). As a case study, the design flow and implementation of the communications subsystem of an on-board computer (OBC) will be presented.

The whole communications subsystem has been developed in a Brazilian university, under an INPE’s contract by a consortium formed by two Brazilian companies. The Telecommand/Telemetry (TC/TM) subsystem has been designed according to the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommendations, and the European Space Agency (ESA) standards. In the presentation, the project roadmap will be discussed, along with some technical aspects of the design such as some of the adopted dependability features, including: ESA/CCSDS TC/TM coding scheme; hardware redundancy; radiation hardened hardware; hardware description language (VHDL) coding style; and design for metastability.

Prof. Eduardo Bezerra is a Researcher and Lecturer of Computer Engineering at Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil, where he is with the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering since 2010. He was formerly with the Faculty of Informatics, Catholic University (PUCRS), Brazil, from 1996 to 2010. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Sussex (Space Science Centre), England, UK, in 2002. He is the author and co-author of papers published covering a broad range of scientific topics within the disciplines of Computer Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of embedded systems, space applications, computer architecture, reconfigurable systems (FPGAs), software and hardware testing, fault tolerance and microprocessor applications. At PUCRS, he was the head of the Embedded Systems Group (GSE) where he led and managed several research projects funded by Brazilian Government Agencies and also by the industry. In 2004 he set up a company named Innalogics at PUCRS Technological Park. Innalogics is a spin-off of GSE aiming the improvement of industry-university collaboration in the field of embedded systems design.

[SEMINAR]
Prof. Eduardo Bezerra
Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil
12pm
Monday, 16 February 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome. No RSVP necessary.

Prof Bezerra is visiting Australia until mid-March. Please join us if you believe there are opportunities for future collaboration based on his areas of research.

Embedded Systems for Space Applications at UFSC/Brazil

Read more...

The Embedded Systems Research Group was set up in 2002 targeting opportunities provided by the Brazilian space industry. Since then, several research works have been conducted, and a couple of products have been delivered to the Brazilian space program, in partnership with local companies. The projects are, basically, in the computer engineering field, where the hardware and software aspects of on-board systems are investigated. The main project delivered so far was a communication module to be employed in future missions. The Telecommand/Telemetry (TC/TM) subsystem has been designed according to the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommendations, and the European Space Agency (ESA) standards. The implemented communications flown is straightforward. Basically, the TC module receives telecommands from ground stations, decodes and unpacks them, and deliveries to the OBC and on-board instruments. The TM module, receives telemetry packets from the OBC, pre-processes and encodes them, and sends to the ground station. The TC and TM channels connecting the subsystem to the OBC are redundant, as well as the OBCs themselves. The TC/TM subsystem has been designed, implemented and tested following strict rules and requirements provided by INPE. It is a vital module for the mission as a whole as, in case of any problem, a TC may not arrive at its destination resulting, for instance, in an engine for attitude control turned on/off at the wrong moment, or the solar panel pointed at the wrong direction. Nevertheless, it is well known that data in an Earth/space link can be easily corrupted, and there are strategies in the ESA/CCSDS recommendations for coping with this communication hazard. Besides the technical aspects of the TC/TM subsystem, other on-going embedded system designs and technologies will be discussed.

Prof. Eduardo Bezerra is a Researcher and Lecturer of Computer Engineering at Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil, where he is with the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering since 2010. He was formerly with the Faculty of Informatics, Catholic University (PUCRS), Brazil, from 1996 to 2010. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Sussex (Space Science Centre), England, UK, in 2002. He is the author and co-author of papers published covering a broad range of scientific topics within the disciplines of Computer Engineering. His research interests are in the areas of embedded systems, space applications, computer architecture, reconfigurable systems (FPGAs), software and hardware testing, fault tolerance and microprocessor applications. At PUCRS, he was the head of the Embedded Systems Group (GSE) where he led and managed several research projects funded by Brazilian Government Agencies and also by the industry. In 2004 he set up a company named Innalogics at PUCRS Technological Park. Innalogics is a spin-off of GSE aiming the improvement of industry-university collaboration in the field of embedded systems design.


[SEMINAR]
Mr Sanat Biswas
ACSER PhD Candidate
2014 IAF Emerging Space Leader


1pm
Wednesday, 11 February 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel


ACSER PhD Student, Mr Sanat Biswas, was selected by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) to participate in the 2014 IAF Emerging Space Leaders Grant Programme. Sanat will provide an overview of his experience of the programme, which was based at the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) in Toronto, Canada, in September/October 2014.

Only fourteen awards were made from more than 109 students and young professionals applying from 40 countries. More information about the award and a full list of the winners is available here.

Advancement in Space Science, Technology and Exploration: Is it Beneficial and Necessary?

Read more...

Space Agencies around the world have dedicated their work force not only to communication, navigation and Earth observation missions, but also to planetary exploration and development of cutting-edge technology for ambitious interplanetary missions. There is however a debate as to whether spending money for space exploration and related technological developments is justified. In 2014 Sanat was named one of only a handful of IAF Emerging Space Leaders and was granted an opportunity to attend International Astronautical Congress where scientists, engineers, lawyers, entrepreneurs, space agency leaders and legislators from different countries came together to showcase advances in space technology and discuss future policy ideas for space. One of Sanat’s goals while interacting at the IAC was to understand the socio-economic benefits expected from future space exploration missions from the perspectives of the varied participants. In this presentation, Sanat will share his views developed at the IAC on the necessity of space exploration. Sanat Kumar Biswas is a PhD student at The Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Sanat received B.E. degree in Instrumentation and Electronics from Jadavpur University in 2010 and M. Tech degree in Aerospace Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 2012. During his M. Tech program he researched on spacecraft navigation in lunar trajectory. He worked as Senior Engineer at Robert Bosch Engineering and Business Solutions from 2012 to 2013. His research interest is spacecraft navigation, GNSS based navigation, satellite attitude control, optimal estimation, nonlinear systems. His current research focus is real-time on-board satellite navigation using multi-GNSS receiver.


[SEMINAR]
Mr Xiaobo GU
ACSER PhD Practicum student

1pm
Wednesday, 6 February 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel

Xiaobo will speak about the research he has completed during his 12 month stay with ACSER on satellite time synchronization systems based on remotely disciplined VCXOs.

[SEMINAR]
Mr Siddharth Pandey
Doctoral Researcher
Space Systems Engineering
SEIT-UNSW Canberra


1pm
Wednesday, 4 February 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel

Investigating Fluidized Granular Flow Behaviour under Martian Surface Conditions for a Pneumatic Regolith Acquisition System

Read more...

Keeping in mind the enormous scientific benefits of returning Mars samples to Earth, efforts are undertaken to improve the performance of a Pneumatic Regolith Acquisition System. Positive pressure pneumatic conveying systems rely on complex layouts for particle transport and require efficient designs. For it to function with redundancy and without human interaction in extra-terrestrial environments, it becomes imminent to model gas-solid flow behaviour and put forth critical findings. These findings shall induce design adjustments that will improve gas- regolith mixing for efficient transport of the samples under Martian conditions. Critical areas to model the flow were singled out: presented here, is the “pneumatic injection- Martian Surface regolith zone” Effects of pneumatic injection velocity vectors upon regolith volume fraction distribution and subsequent transport within the system is studied within a cylindrical pipe with inlets for gas injection onto the exposed regolith surface area. Key gas nozzle design variations are modeled and tested for appreciation of captured regolith mass. Increasing nozzle injection angles are compared to swirl injected nozzles and regolith volume fraction distributions are studied in radial and axial planes. Effect of gas velocity on the regolith lift rates is studied and basic conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of certain nozzle configurations. Challenges faced during modelling and future work to be carried out are listed. The CFD results are used to design and fabricate nozzle prototypes that are tested with two different regolith simulants and air for varying inlet pressures. The final sets of results attained are compared with the theoretical results and the set requirements are met. Key challenges faced and future work is laid out.

Siddharth Pandey is a PhD student at University of New South Wales at Canberra, Australia. His work is on Understanding Thermal Convection on Martian Surface to aid Design of a Mars bound Rover. Previously, he was an Education Associate at NASA Ames Research Center. He worked on investigating Fluidized Granular Flows in reduced gravity to aid design of Pneumatic Sample Acquisition Systems. He also worked with the Space Biosciences Division to design and develop Microgravity Bioscience Payload for research conducted on board the International Space Station. He holds a Master’s degree in Space Systems Engineering from Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands and a Bachelor’s Degree in Aerospace Engineering from Amity University, India.

[SEMINAR]
Mr Peeter Wilkinson
Project Controller for the Future Missions Office
under the Science Programme (Cosmic Vision 2015-2025)
European Space Agency


Tuesday, 13 January 2015
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel

Mr Wilkinson, a UNSW Alumnus (and ex-BLUEsat Team), will provide an overview of ESA activity along with personal insights based on his 8 years of service with the organisation. He is presently the Project Controller for the Future Missions Office under the Science Programme. Cosmic Vision 2015–2025 is the current cycle of ESA's long-term planning for space science missions. It is the latest in a series of mechanisms through which ESA's science missions are implemented and provides the stability needed for activities which typically take over two decades to go from initial concept to the production of scientific results. For more information on Cosmic Vision 2015–2025 visit the ESA website.

2014

Annual Space Industry Association of Australia Distinguished Lecture:

The UK Space Transformation - Lessons for Australia

Dr David Williams
Executive Director, National Facilities and Collections, CSIRO
Former Chief Executive, UK Space Agency and former Chairman of the European Space Agency


6pm - 7pm
Thursday, 27 November 2014
Law Theatre G04, Law Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

Click here to watch this seminar on our YouTube Channel

Dr Williams joined the CSIRO in Australia in 2013, bringing with him a wealth of experience in space agency leadership in the UK and Europe. He will speak about the remarkable transformation taking place in the UK space sector as a result of renewed government and private sector cooperation and investment. He will relate his European experience to the challenges faced by the Australian space sector and will comment on the opportunities as well as the challenges that lie ahead.

For further information see the SIAA website.

SPACE TALK:
How the Ukraine Crisis will shape US Space activity in the next 10 years

30th October 2014
6pm
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


In this talk, our speaker Wayne Short, will explain why the recent events in the Crimea will probably force the USA to develop new rocket engines for space missions.

Wayne Short has University degrees in both engineering and information technology. He grew up in Sydney in the 1960’s where as a child he was enthralled with the space exploration achievements of America and the Soviet Union in the race to first land on the moon.

He is currently president of the National Space Society of Australia (NSSA) and also co-chair of the Australian Space Research Conference (ASRC). The NSSA is a not-for-profit advocacy organisation whose goal is to “Create a Space-faring Civilisation”.

With members across the country; the NSSA runs local chapter meetings to the public as well as organises conferences on behalf of the NSSA for Educators (the Australian Space Research Conference) and Business, Industry and government (Australian Space Development Conference).

SEMINAR:
Australian Space Research Conference 2014 Presentations
by ACSER/UNSW Staff and Students

26th September 2014
1pm
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


  • William Crowe (PhD Candidate)
    Robotic swarms as means to autonomously and rapidly characterise small celestial bodies
  • Scott Dorrington (PhD Candidate)
    Trajectory Design for Asteroid Retrieval Missions
  • Joshua Brandt (PhD Candidate)
    The Breakup of Liquid Jets in Reduced Gravity Conditions
  • Dr Joon Wayn Cheong (Research Associate)
    Real-Time Acquisition and Tracking of Galileo E1 Signals in Low Earth Orbit Scenarios
  • Steph McArthur (BLUEsat Off World Robotics)
    BLUEsat Robotics to Mars: Lessons on real world testing for student projects

The 14th Australian Space Research Conference (ASRC, formerly the Australian Space conference or ASSC), will be held in Adelaide at the University of South Australia. This will be the eighth ASRC jointly sponsored and organised by the National Committee for Space and Radio Science (NCSRS) and the National Space Society of Australia (NSSA), with the support of the Australian Space Research Institute (ASRI) and the Mars Society of Australia AMEC.

In 2014 ACSER team members are contributing 11 presentations and 3 posters to the conference, comprising over 10% of the total number of submissions. This is in addition to a very strong turn out from fellow UNSW Faculty of Engineering and Faculty of Science representatives.

SEMINAR:
International Astronautical Congress 2014 Presentations

17th September 2014
1pm
Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


(1) Sanat Biswas (ACSER PhD Candidate)
Real-Time On-Board Satellite Navigation using GPS and Galileo Measurements

Abstract:
Use of GPS for real-time on-board navigation of LEO satellites is an intriguing and cost effective technique. GPS measurements using post processing can produce orbit estimation within centimetre level accuracy. It is well-established that using space borne GPS receivers, an on-board navigation computer can estimate satellite position with accuracy of 10 metre in real-time. Inclusion of GLONASS and Galileo measurements in the process can make the real-time navigation system of spacecraft more reliable, robust and accurate by reducing the chance of blind spots and increasing the number of measurements. In the present work, a simulation platform for the real-time navigation using a multi-GNSS receiver is developed for navigational performance analysis. TanDEM-X is chosen as a test satellite with Galileo measurements simulated for the known satellite using a SPIRENT simulator. The measurement simulation includes receiver clock bias, ionospheric delay and random noise. The simulated Galileo measurements are used in an Extended Kalman Filter to estimate the position and velocity of TanDEM-X in an inertial Cartesian frame. Publicly available TanDEM-X GPS receiver measurement data are used in a separate Extended Kalman Filter and the navigation solution is compared with the solution obtained from simulated Galileo measurement for verification. For the multi-GNSS receiver experiment, Hardware in the Loop Simulation is designed which includes a UNSW Namuru GNSS receiver. GPS and Galileo constellation signals simulated by a Spirent GNSS signal simulator are captured by the Namuru receiver and the measurements are used to estimate the position and velocity of the satellite.

Sanat Kumar Biswas is a PhD student in School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunication at the University of New South Wales (UNSW). His research interest is spacecraft navigation; GNSS based navigation, optimal estimation, satellite attitude control. His current research focus is real-time on-board satellite navigation using multi-Global Navigation Satellite System receiver. He is also associated with Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research and worked on de-tumbling of cube-sat UNSW-EC0. Sanat received his Bachelor of Engineering in Instrumentation and Electronics from Jadavpur University in 2010 and M. Tech in Aerospace Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay in 2012. During his M. Tech program he researched on spacecraft navigation in lunar trajectory. He worked as Senior Engineer at Robert Bosch Engineering and Business Solutions from 2012 to 2013.


(2) Thien Nguyen (BLUEsat)
Tracking Aircraft via CubeSat Constellations


Abstract:
Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is currently being adopted by aviation authorities around the world as the standard method for tracking aircraft during flight. ADS-B coverage is available on most of the landmass in Europe, North America, Australia and South East Asia. However, gaps in coverage exist over regions where installing ADS-B receiver stations is not economically viable or feasible, such as over oceans and poles. To close these gaps, ADS-B signals can be received and retransmitted from satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). There is an increased commercial interest in implementing ADS-B re-transmitting satellite constellations. The Iridium NEXT and second Globalstar constellations of LEO satellites that are currently under development will provide a space based ADS-B service. Using a constellation of CubeSats provides a more economical solution, with lower production, launch and satellite replacement costs. The key challenge in the design of such system entails balancing coverage area and revisit times against cost and CubeSat technological limitations.
In our research, we performed analysis of these trade-offs and provide an insight into requirements of such a system. We modelled popular flights over the North Pole and Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (where ADS-B coverage is not available) in Systems Tool Kit (STK) with standard commercial ADS- B transmitters. These flight paths were analysed to determine the coverage requirements of a space based ADS-B system. Aviation safety requirements from various global authorities were researched to determine the system update rates necessary to provide a safety critical service. These requirements lay the groundwork for the systems development necessary to launch and operate an ADS-B constellation.

Thien Nguyen is a final year Engineering and Mathematics student at UNSW Australia. During his undergraduate career, Thien has completed industry projects with Thales Alenia Space, Genesys Electronics Design and has participated in numerous research initiatives under ACSER and the BLUEsat Group. Thien has been directly involved in BLUEsat's recent revitalisation and helped spearhead numerous new project initiatives, including the Off World Robotics Team and CubeSat research arm of BLUEsat. Thien recently completed an honours research thesis on Satellite Constellation design and is set to graduate with First Class Honours at the end of 2014. He remains an ongoing member of the BLUEsat project and aspires to be a leader in the Australian Space Industry.

SEMINAR: 2014 Institute of Navigation GNSS Conference Papers
Ryan Thompson
ACSER


5th September 2014
12:30pm
Room 224, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.

SEMINAR: UNSW Canberra Space Initiative
Professor Russell Boyce
Chair for Space Engineering, UNSW Canberra


26th August 2014
4pm Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.

UNSW Canberra is investing heavily to develop the capability and capacity to routinely develop and fly low-cost in-orbit missions, in ways that set us apart, for performing innovative science in space.

Such missions would be supported by innovative ground-based experiments and supercomputer simulations, following the SCRAMSPACE embodiment of world best practice for aerospace research. The capability rests on 7 areas of activity, ranging from engineering to operations to science, and builds on existing in-house expertise.

Significant opportunity exists for exciting international space research, including PhD research for outstanding engineers and scientists.

Professor Russell Boyce holds the position of Chair for Space Engineering at UNSW Canberra, bringing 25 years experience (including leading the $14M international SCRAMSPACE project) in studying the interaction between high speed vehicles and their environment in the field of hypersonics and scramjets, to the interaction between satellites / space debris and their near-Earth environment. He is the Chairman of the Australian Academy of Science’s National Committee for Space and Radio Science, and is a member of the Executive Council of the Space Industry Association of Australia.

SEMINAR: Off World Robotics
(1) BLUEsat Off World Robotics Team
(2) Steven Hobbs, UNSW Canberra PhD Candidate


13th August 2014
12pm Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.

Today's presentations cover the work of two separate UNSW teams at the recent Arkaroola Mars Robot Challenge Expedition hosted by Mars Society Australia (MSA). For more information on the Arkaroola Mars Robot Challenge click here.

SEMINAR: Delta-V, CubeSats & Rocket Lab - Space 2.0 Hotting Up
Dr Tim Parsons
Advisor, Saber Astronautics
Member and Sydney Chapter Representative, Space Angels Network
Founding Executive, delta-V SpaceHub


6th August 2014
12pm Room G3, Electrical Engineering Building
UNSW Kensington Campus

All welcome, no RSVP required.


Last week's launch party for NZ startup Rocket Lab's Electron smallsat launch system shows that local aerospace talent - when properly pitched - can attract Silicon Valley investors. Delta-v founding exec Tim Parsons will argue that Australian startup talent is uniquely positioned to take a major role in the global Space 2.0 market, and needs to get cracking now to open up huge commercial opportunities.

Off-earth Mining: The research questions

22nd July 2014
Old Main Building, Room 51
UNSW Kensington Campus

The aim of this event is to identify researchers in cross-disciplinary fields who might be interested in engaging in the very broad issues relating to off-earth mining.

Click here for more information.

GNSS Futures Workshop and the Return of the UNSW SNAP Lab

7th - 8th July 2014
UNSW Kensington Campus



The Satellite Navigation and Positioning (SNAP) Laboratory at UNSW has been a global leader in GNSS research for over two decades. On the 7th and 8th of July 2014, we will celebrate the relaunching of the SNAP Lab with the “GNSS Futures” workshop, examining where GNSS, and positioning/navigation technology in general will go in the coming decades.

Click here for more information.

ACSER @ CeBIT Australia 2014

5th - 7th May 2014
Sydney Olympic Park

As a delta-V Space Enterprise Accelerator founding member, ACSER was present at this year's CeBIT exhibition in an effort to provide national leadership for Australian space engineering research by fostering collaborations between researchers, industry and government and to nurture links between our national and international partners to achieve Australia’s space ambitions.

SEMINAR:
University College London (UCL) Electronic and Electrical Engineering Research Overview and Radar Activities - Prof Karl Woodbridge (University College London)


2nd May 2014
Room G3
Ground floor
Electrical Engineering Building (G17)
UNSW Kensington Campus

University College London is one of the world’s premier Universities with Nobel Prizes being awarded to 21 former academics and graduates. The Electronic and Electrical Engineering Department was the first to be established in the UK in 1885 with J.A. Fleming as it’s first Professor. Today Internationally leading research is carried out in a range of areas including communications, electronic materials, photonics, optical networks and sensor systems. Within the Systems, Circuits and Sensors group there is an active radar systems research group involving a total of around 30 academic and research staff, visitors and students. Research activities range from simulation and modeling through signal processing and hardware design to system build and field trials. Areas of interest cover a wide range of applications and include, target recognition and classification, multi-static/netted sensing, sea clutter/maritime target detection, passive radar, land mine detection and terrain monitoring. In this seminar, following some brief background on UCL and the EEE Department some selected examples of research in the areas of micro-Doppler target classification, multi-static sea clutter/maritime target detection and airborne passive radar will be presented.

Karl Woodbridge is Professor of Electronic Engineering in the Electronic and Electrical Engineering Department at University College London. Prior to joining UCL he worked for 10 years in semiconductor device research at Philips Research Laboratories. Current research interests include semiconductor devices, multi-static radar systems, maritime surveillance, target tracking and classification and passive sensing. He has published over 200 journal and conference papers in the above areas and has been involved in organizing and technical committees for many national and international seminars and conferences. He is a Fellow of the IET, a Fellow of the UK Institute of Physics and a Senior Member of the IEEE. He is also currently a visiting Professor at the University of Cape Town and Chairman of the IET Sonar, Radar and Navigation Technical and Professional Network Executive.

SEMINAR:
Research Under Reduced Gravity Conditions
- Dr Barnaby Osborne (ACSER, UNSW Australia)

1st May 2014
Room G3
Ground floor
Electrical Engineering Building (G17)
UNSW Kensington Campus

Research under reduced gravity conditions allows the investigation into physical phenomena that are typically masked by gravitational forces. This has implications for both purely scientific research as well as applied research. Reduced gravity experimentation is important to many diverse fields of research including materials science, biotechnology, fluid dynamics and combustion. Experimentation in reduced gravity is difficult to carry out with limited access to both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial experimental facilities. This seminar will present on two aspects of microgravity experimentation being carried out in ACSER: 1. A novel ground based microgravity test facility; and 2. A microgravity fluid dynamics experiment for the International Space Station (ISS).

  1. Novel microgravity catapult - The Microgravity catapult is a novel ground based microgravity testing facility that utilises a linear motor actuated catapult mechanism to drive the experiment up and down a 8m column. For 2.2 seconds the experiment experiences a reduced gravity environment. This approach differs from traditional methods of ground based microgravity testing (drop towers) and gives significant advantages in the control of the environment and frequency of the testing.
  2. SMiLE - The Spun Microgravity Liquid Experiment (SMiLE) is a fluid dynamics research project that is to be carried out onboard the ISS. The experiment investigates two phase fluid flows in reduced gravity. Specifically, two phenomena are investigated: Centrifugal separation in low rotation rate spun tanks; and Liquid drop formation, both in a reduced gravity environment. The experiment has been designed to interface with commercially available experiment slots for small experiments (10cm x 10cm x 10cm) on the ISS and will run for a minimum of 1 week.

This seminar will provide an overview of both projects, the operational capabilities and an update on the current status of each.

Dr Barnaby Osborne received his BEng and PhD from the University of Queensland in 1999 and 2008 respectively. Between 2006 and 2007 he worked as a testing and instrumentation engineer for an engineering firm specialising in failure analysis and design optimisation and from 2007 through to 2012 as a senior lecturer and field leader for the astronautics and space systems degree at Kingston University. He is currently a academic fellow at UNSW working primarily on the QB50 and Warrawal projects. He has research interests in microgravity physics and microgravity facility design, hybrid, solid and monopropellant propulsion and space composites. Dr Osborne has a published over 30 papers in peer reviewed journals and conferences.

SPACE TALK: Prospecting and harvesting asteroids to serve expanding markets in space

11th March 2014
Ritchie Theatre
Scientia Building (G19)
UNSW Kensington Campus

With several billionaires now operating or building breakthrough new launch systems, markets in space will rapidly expand beyond the current $300 billion industry. Deep Space Industries starts by carrying out asteroid scouting missions for national space agencies, conducting technology-development flight testing for them, and serving media/sponsorship buyers. Launching anything to high Earth orbit costs $17 million/ton, so even cheap commodities like propellant become enormously valuable once in space. DSI will be the “local source” of commodities that otherwise would have to be launched from Earth. Presented by David Gump, CEO of Deep Space Industries

Photos from the event can be viewed here.

2013
GNSS Vulnerability Workshop

4th December 2013

Modern day infrastructure is becoming increasingly dependent on positioning and timing services provided by the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). As a result the risk of (illegal) personal privacy devices, which jam GNSS, the potential for serious consequences is increasing.

ACSER hosted a one day workshop that brought together speakers from government organisations, companies and universities working in the field and day-to-day GNSS users. Discussions covered the reliance of critical infrastructure on GNSS, the extent of potential damage and vulnerability, and possible solutions to alleviate these vulnerabilities.

Photos from the event can be viewed here and for more information about the workshop please visit the event website.

QB50 Workshop

29th November 2013

QB50 is a network of 50 CubeSats that will be launched together in the first half of 2015 into a 'string-of-pearls' configuration in a circular orbit at 320 km altitude, inclination 79 degrees. These CubeSats will comprise a mix of atmospheric double CubeSats and double or triple CubeSats for science and technology demonstration.

With the UNSW's QB50 team efforts over the past 18 months this workshop brought together all participants as the team is in the final stages of preparing final documentation for the Critical Design Review (CDR). Discussions throughout the workshop covered the QB50 experiment goals and requirements, the cubesat system design, the UNSW/NICTA payloads and experiments and the current progress/needs of the project.

Photos from the event can be viewed here and for more information about the workshop please visit the event website.

Australian Space Industry Forum

14th November 2013

The Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research in cooperation with the Space Industry Association of Australia (SIAA) hosted a Space Industry Panel discussing "The Australian Space Industry - Where to from here?".

The Australian Space Industry is at the cross roads, after a highly successful Australian Space Research Program and the endorsement by the Australian Government of a national Satellite Utilisation Policy, the industry is once again in uncertainty about the future direction of space activity in Australia. The forum heard from a cross section of Australia's present and future space industry leaders who shared their views on the future direction of the space industry in Australia.

Photos from the event can be viewed here and for more information about the forum please visit the event website.

Roadmap to an Australian Civilian Satellite SAR Capability - Workshop

8th October 2013

Recently, three reports were delivered to the government on Australia's SAR requirements. This workshop brought together the Australian leaders in the SAR industry to discuss how to proceed from these submissions towards a satellite SAR capability for Australia. The authors of the three reports presented their findings, along with users and deliverers of the SAR application studied in the third report: soil moisture, along with a representative of the earth observation community.

Curiosity on Mars - ACSER Distinguished Guest Lecture

21st February 2013

René Fradet visited the University of New South Wales to present the key note at the Off Earth Mining Forum and an ACSER distinguished guest lecture on the NASA Curiosity Rover that landed on Mars in 2012.

René Fradet is the Deputy Director, Engineering and Science Directorate at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The talk discussed the tremendous successes of Curiosity so far, from landing on Mars to photographing, sampling and inspecting her surface.

Photos from the event can be viewed here and for more information about the Curiosity on Mars public lecture please visit the event website.

Off Earth Mining Forum

19th - 21st February 2013

The Off Earth Mining Forum was a three day event at UNSW hosted by the Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research. The forum focused on identifying the challenges that face the race to mine the moon and nearby celestial bodies and explored some of the possible pathways and technologies that might offer a solution.

The conference provided a forum for communication among current and future industry leaders and also provided an opportunity for scientists and engineers to discuss how current technology and research may be used to establish a viable off earth mining program.

It was a very successful event which attracted over 100 attendees and significant international and local media attention.

For more information or to view the program, photos, videos and the slides from the whole event please visit the event website.

2012
GNSS Remote Sensing Workshop

5th December 2012

The GNSS Remote Sensing Workshop was held on the 5th December 2012 at University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia.

There were presentations made from both the university of New South Wales and also RMIT in Melbourne. Useful discussions were held between all workshop attendees and motivated new research collaborations between various organisations.

The GNSS Remote Sensing Workshop agenda can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

Slides from all of the presentations can be viewed on the workshop website.

PhD Information Evening

15th October 2012

On the 15th October 2012 the Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research (ACSER) held its first PhD Information Evening. Held in the Faculty of Engineering Design Studio studnets interesed in doing a PhD at ACSER in 2013 were able to talk to the whole ACSER team about their interests in space research accompanied by canapes and drinks. The ACSER team was able to answer questions about their current and future research and also their experiences completing Phd's.

Photos from the evening can be viewed here and for more information please visit the event webpage.

6U Cubesat Workshop

17th - 18th July 2012

The 6U CubeSat Low Cost Space Missions Workshop was held on the 17th - 18th July 2012 at the Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre, Mt Stromlo Observatory, Canberra Australia. The workshop explored the range of missions possible with a 6U CubeSat in the areas of:

  • Astronomy
  • Atmospheric Science and other Planetary Science
  • Space Physics
  • Earth Observation
  • Biology
  • Other

There were presentations made from various universities, government organisations and international companies. There was a keynote presentation by John Hines from Nasa Ames and also from Harvey Butcher from ANU. Useful discussions were held between all workshop attendees and motivated new research collaborations between various organisations.

The 6U Workshop agenda can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

Slides from all of the presentations can be viewed on the workshop website.

UAV Workshop

14th June 2012

The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Workshop was held on the 14th June 2012 at the University of New South Wales. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble everyone from UNSW who is active in any aspect of research involving UAVs.

There were presentations made from representatives from School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW Canberra, School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems, School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications and also School of Mining Engineering. The workshop provided a forum for the exchange of information between UAV experts, technology providers and end users. Useful discussions were held between all workshop attendees and motivated new research collaborations within UNSW.

The UAV Workshop agenda can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

Cubesats: Missions, Payloads, Subsystems Workshop

5th March 2012

The Cubesats: Missions, Payloads, Subsystems Workshop was held on the 5th March 2012 at the University of New South Wales. The purpose of this workshop was for researchers to present ideas for small projects demonstrating UNSW's space capabilities. There were presentations from 6 different researchers focusing on small cubesat missions. ACSER has secured funding of $70k for these projects.After the workshop, interested researchers had two weeks to submit a short proposal. We received five proposals for a demonstrator project.

With generous support from Faculty of Engineering UNSW and the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), we are pleased to announce that winning projects are;

  • "Simulation of a high performance Attitude Control System for a 6U CubeSat” – Steven Tsitas $30,000

  • "Experimental Space-borne Lidar Payload for CO2 Concentration Mapping” – Manny Dionizio, John Trinder, Jeremy Bailey and Daniel Cotton $25,000

  • "Formation flying technology using UAV platforms” - Yong Li, Jinling Wang, Matthew Garratt, Zoran Vulovic and John Page $15,000

The workshop agenda can be downloaded from here.

Photos from the Cubesats Workshop can be viewed here.

2011
Garada Annual Consortium Meeting 2012

8th - 9th December 2011

The Garada Annual Consortium Meeting was held on the 8th - 9th December 2011 at the University of New South Wales. During the two-day meeting, the Garada consortium members and project advisors discussed their research and investigations conducted over 2011 and also their research plans for the year ahead in 2012. Presentations were made by a representative from each work package over the two days. The Annual Consortium Meeting also provided a great opportunity for all of the Consortium members to meet and discuss specifics of the Garada Project.

The consortium meeting agenda can be downloaded from here.

Photos from the Consortium Meeting can be viewed here.

Warrawal Project Launch

7th - 9th December 2011

The Warrawal project launch was held on the 7th - 9th December 2011 at the University of New South Wales. During the three-day meeting, the Warrawal consortium members discussed their research strengths and contributions to the project. Presentations were made by a representative from each work package explaining the planned progress for the following year. The Consortium Meeting also provided a great opportunity for all of the Consortium members to meet and discuss specifics of the Warrawal Project.

Garada SAR Workshop

7th December 2011

The Garada SAR Workshop was held on the 7th December 2011 at the University of New South Wales. The SAR Workshop provided expert presentations on SAR techniques covering fundamental principles, sensor systems, design considerations, application areas and the benefits of GPS formation-flying.

There were presentations made from representatives from Astrium Limited (UK), Defence Science Technology Organisation, Geoscience Australia, University of New South Wales and also Defence Imagery and Geospatial Organisation. The workshop provided a forum for the exchange of information between SAR experts, technology providers and end users. Useful discussions were held between all workshop attendees which allowed for an improved understanding of SAR in the wider remote sensing community.

The SAR Workshop agenda can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

Disaster Management Workshop

6th December 2011

The Disaster Management Workshop was held on the 6th December 2011 at the University of New South Wales. The workshop brought together people at the policy level with researchers, satellite service providers as well as users of satellites in disasters. There were presentations made from representatives from the Australian Space Policy Unit, Bureau of Meteorology, Geoscience Australia, Astrium Limited (UK), Optus Wholesale & Satellite, NewSat, Australian Satellite Communication P/L, University of New South Wales, Bushfire Council NT and also DSE Victoria.

The workshop promoted discussions about using satellites for disaster preparedness and response. By bringing all the stakeholders together at the Disaster Management Workshop ACSER has help to developed better communication and integration between different organisations when it comes to responding in emergency situations.

The Disaster Management Workshop agenda can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

Platforms and Payloads

20 June 2011

The Platforms and Payloads Workshop was held on 26th May and the aim was to organise a demonstrator project for a space-potential instrument or experiment that will fly on a UNSW platform. An opportunity was created for collaboration within the University of New South Wales for a payload with potential space applications to be attached to an existing platform. The discussion at the workshop invited opinions on the ideas of how this could be done and what potential applications it could have. The workshop consisted of four platform presentations, one optimisation presentation and seven payload presentations. After the workshop, interested researchers had two weeks to submit a short proposal. We received six proposals for a demonstrator project.

With generous support from Faculty of Engineering UNSW and the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), we are pleased to announce that winning projects worth $30,000 each are;

  • "Feasibility Study of an Air Drop Microgravity Capability" Tracie Barber, Andrew Neely, Guan Yeoh, Murat Tahtali, Tim White and Ravi Sood

  • "3D Ranging and Mapping for Satellite Remote Sensing" Matt Garratt, Jinling Wang, Andrew Lambert and Xiupia Jia

We were also able to offer two smaller grants worth $5,000 for further development to:

  • "Fire Detection and Monitoring" John Trinder and Tony Milne

  • "Spacecraft Experimental Bus" John Page, John Olsen and Zoran Vulovic

The seminar program can be downloaded from here and photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

GNSS Vulnerability Seminar

9 March 2011

Over the past couple of years it is becoming apparent that GNSS systems that nations are heavily dependant on for positioning, navigation and timing are vulnerable to jamming and interference. With the increasing vulnerability threat on such a fundamental system it is critical to address this issue and determine a solution. The GNSS workshop aims to bring together members from different government organisations, industry companies and universities. Through collaborate of these great minds it is hoped to realise the extent of this issue and what is being done to reduce the threat.

The workshop will be broken up into three sessions to discuss the issue of GNSS vulnerability from a variety of different perspectives. The first section will feature presentations from government authorities such as the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) to explain the regulations in place for these bands of the spectrum and also what is currently being undertaken to monitor and control these sections of spectrum.

The second section of the workshop involves presentations from critical users of GPS. They will explain how their applications can be affected by instances of jamming and interference. Through these presentations insight will be given to the extent of damage and risk that such a threat on GNSS could produce.

Finally the third section of the workshop will be from current researches and universities in Australia that are currently working on being able to detect and limit both jamming and interference. Through these presentations all guests will be able to see what work is currently being done on finding a solution to this threat. This will also provide a great opportunity for the researchers to provide recommendations to the government authorities on the most appropriate action.

The seminar program can be downloaded from here.

All the presentations from the seminar can be downloaded from here and the photos from the seminar can be seen in the GNSS Vulnerability Workshop Album.

Garada Project Launch

20-21 January 2011

The Garada project investigates synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites flying in small formations to significantly enhance real-time environmental monitoring. Developing the satellite-positioning accuracy essential for formation-flying, this project aims to realise major scientific innovation while addressing urgent national and global challenges.

The project launch took place in a workshop held on the 20-21 January 2011 at the University of New South Wales. During the two-day workshop, the Garada consortium members and project advisors discussed their research strengths and contributions to the project. The workshop agenda can be downloaded from here.

Photos from the workshop can be viewed here.

More information about the Garada project can be found on the Garada website accessed from here.